Dec , 2013

Posted by in Waste Management | 0 Comments

Brass Recycling in Vineland Saves Resources

Brass recycling not only saves valuable resources, it generates income for the recycler. While aluminum cans are regularly recycled, many valuable brass items are discarded directly into the solid waste stream. According to American Iron and Metal International (Americanscrapmetal.net), nearly 70 percent of all metal is not recycled. Not only does that create a great deal of waste, it necessitates the use of precious natural resources to create products that could easily use recycled metals.

Companies that specialize in collecting and recycling a variety of metals are a boon to the region, as they can significantly reduce the amount of space required for landfill space. Top recyclers move metals like steel, aluminum, brass and copper through a controlled process to separate the metals to allow them to be reused for a wide variety of products. In addition, recycling reduces the need for mining operations that often create environmental issues in the areas where they are located.

Brass recycling in Vineland is not difficult. It only requires that individuals not throw out products that are made of brass. Saving any metals from the garbage is wise for contractors and homeowners, as the metals quickly add up to a point where they are worth a great deal of money. For example, a company that re-keys their doors may end up with several pounds of quality brass very quickly. When added to the other sources of brass, the value builds rapidly.

Both red and yellow brass are in demand. Brass recycling in Vineland should be considered as a way to go green for companies that regularly come in contact with the metals. Plumbers and pipe fitters often encounter the metal in the course of their work. Simply changing some old habits can increase the profit for a job without any additional investment from the company. Throwing used brass in a bucket for recycling is no more difficult than tossing it into a dumpster.

Brass recycling in Vineland should be a part of an overall recycling program that moves toward lowering society’s dependence on using newly mined ores. Making it part of a business plan only makes good economic sense.

    

Be the first to like.

Share
    Shares
    Share This